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In three thousand years somebody will doubtless try and prove that actually Americans weren't settled from the UK because their attitudes to burial rites differ so much  8)

To be fair, many Americans weren't settled from the UK (even counting C19th Irish as being of UK origin).

cheers
Mick

Those of European origin, whether direct or indirectly also come from a culture which doesn't have a problem with building on burial grounds. It's just fascinating to watch cultures diverge
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In three thousand years somebody will doubtless try and prove that actually Americans weren't settled from the UK because their attitudes to burial rites differ so much  8)

To be fair, many Americans weren't settled from the UK (even counting C19th Irish as being of UK origin).

cheers
Mick
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Thanks Duncan - appreciated. I’ll pass that on.
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https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2021/01/significant-anglo-saxon-cemetery-and.html#.YBA7YD0QJc4

its a big dig...

I confess I always smile wryly when Americans worry about building on ancient burial grounds    ???

Mmmh...that's a big dig at the Americans (and they don't want one  ::) )

Just musing aloud.
Given that they technically share much the same culture and in theory at least the same religion, I find the divergence interesting.
Yet in the Ancient world we're surprised that Greeks living a couple of thousand miles from Greece evolve differently, in an era when the journey could take weeks evolve differently yet in a world with instant communication we see how far Americans and English differ in what are culturally very basic things. In three thousand years somebody will doubtless try and prove that actually Americans weren't settled from the UK because their attitudes to burial rites differ so much  8)
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Late Republican helmets were mostly bronze Montefortino and Coolus types, with some iron Gallic styles (the Agen-Port styles) being adopted from Caesar's day onwards.

Imperial legionaries might wear iron or bronze. Auxiliaries are a lot less certain, but also probably both, with maybe bronze being more common then in the legions.
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He also had a daredevil streak.  Under the guise of researching what it was like to experience anti-aircraft fire, he blagged a seat in a Wellington bomber on a raid on an Italian air field.  To get a better view , he sat in the front turret.  The air defences were a disappointment though so the bomber crew decided to beat up the airfield, Wheeler blazing away with the turret guns.  Indiana Jones eat your heart out.
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The excavation seems to have been done with Wheeler boxes - very Old School.
Thread drift I realise, but one quaint aspect of Wheeler's career is that during WW2, when he was a TA anti-aircraft regiment CO, his standardised design for AA machine-gun pits was based on Celtic roundhouses...
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https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2021/01/significant-anglo-saxon-cemetery-and.html#.YBA7YD0QJc4

its a big dig...

I confess I always smile wryly when Americans worry about building on ancient burial grounds    ???

Mmmh...that's a big dig at the Americans (and they don't want one  ::) )
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Little debate ongoing on another forum...

Was the late Republican Roman helmet bronze?

And early Empire, 1st century AD, were auxilia in bronze helmets, legionaries in steel?

That’s what I gleaned from AEIR, but wondered if it had been changed through more recent research.
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The excavation seems to have been done with Wheeler boxes - very Old School.
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