Author Topic: Portraying the Poeni  (Read 31 times)

Chris

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Portraying the Poeni
« on: October 10, 2021, 11:01:40 AM »
Explanatory Note:
The following was prepared, revised, formatted and submitted to Slingshot, The Journal of The Society of Ancients, in late May/early June of 2020. Unfortunately, and I readily admit to my slight disappointment as well as greater confusion, it was not accepted for publication. Evidently and without knowing, I had committed the tactical error or perhaps it was a strategic blunder of writing too many articles/reports for a publication that depends entirely on contributions from its members for material. This curious situational irony aside (one could point to a group of individuals who have contributed a large number of articles or “dominated” the pages of the publication), the rejected piece has been posted to my blog in the hopes that at least a few dozen ancient wargamers will read it and perhaps a fraction of those hearty individuals will take the time to offer a comment or two. In a departure from previous entries, I have decided to keep the punctuation and spelling of this “paper” as British English instead of correcting/revising it to American English.

PORTRAYING THE POENI


What might a Tactica II Early Carthaginian army list look like? Would there be points of similarity between it and the Carthaginian (2nd Punic War) list which is found on page L13 of the spiral-bound rulebook? My guess is that there would some commonalities and or shared unit types. Readily stipulating to the fact that I have absolutely no experience when it comes to creating army lists and embarrassingly little experience with playing at war using Arty Conliffe’s Tactica II rules, especially when compared to veterans like Mark Grindlay, Dr. Paul Innes, and Simon Watson [1] (perhaps Silver Shields would be a more appropriate title for this trio of accomplished gentlemen?), I still wanted to give it a try. The following tables, for better or worse, and for the constructive criticism and remarks or blanket disinterest they might generate, are the product of this admittedly and completely amateur, average student-of-ancient-military-history effort. Without further ado then, let me begin - or attempt to begin - with a consideration of the mounted arm.

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  • Chris Hahn